All Videos Tagged peer (Open Access Week) - Open Access Week 2020-10-20T11:41:11Z http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/video/listTagged?tag=peer&rss=yes&xn_auth=no Libre | Liberating Research tag:openaccessweek.ning.com,2013-09-05:5385115:Video:97282 2013-09-05T20:06:57.150Z Pandelis Perakakis http://openaccessweek.ning.com/profile/PandelisPerakakis <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/libre-liberating-research"><br /> <img src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974031954?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br /><a href="http://www.libreapp.org">http://www.libreapp.org</a> <a href="http://www.openscholar.org.uk">http://www.openscholar.org.uk</a> <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/libre-liberating-research"><br /> <img src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974031954?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br /><a href="http://www.libreapp.org">http://www.libreapp.org</a> <a href="http://www.openscholar.org.uk">http://www.openscholar.org.uk</a> Scholarly/Scientific Impact Metrics in the Open Access Era tag:openaccessweek.ning.com,2010-11-16:5385115:Video:11363 2010-11-16T02:37:33.363Z Stevan Harnad http://openaccessweek.ning.com/profile/StevanHarnad <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/scholarlyscientific-impact"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="178" src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974029465?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=178" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>The real merit of research is in its specific, substantive content. But if a contribution proves important and useful, it will be taken up, built upon and cited in subsequent research. Scientometrics attempts to estimate and quantify this research uptake and impact. The classical metric of research productivity had been publication counts ("publish or perish") and the prestige of… <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/scholarlyscientific-impact"><br /> <img src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974029465?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=178" width="240" height="178" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />The real merit of research is in its specific, substantive content. But if a contribution proves important and useful, it will be taken up, built upon and cited in subsequent research. Scientometrics attempts to estimate and quantify this research uptake and impact. The classical metric of research productivity had been publication counts ("publish or perish") and the prestige of their publication venues (refereed journals or scholarly monographs), based on their prior track records for quality and importance. Publication counts were soon supplemented by "journal impact factors" (average citation counts), and eventually also by individual article and author citation counts. In the online era, the potential metrics have extended further to include download counts, growth and decay rates for metrics, co-citation measures, and more elaborate a-priori formulas such as the "h-index" and its variants. Still prominently missing today, however, are three things: (1) book metrics, (2) a validation of the metrics, discipline by discipline, that tests and confirms their meaning and predictive power, especially in research assessment, and (3) a sufficiently large and open webwide database to allow the global research community to test, validate and monitor its metrics (which are currently collected systematically only by proprietary commercial databases). The Open Access (OA) movement (for providing free online access to all journal articles) is helping to generate the requisite OA database for articles by extending universities' and funders' "publish or perish" mandates to also require their authors to make their publications OA by depositing them in their institution's OA repository. OA not only makes it possible to harvest research impact metrics webwide, but it has also been shown to increase them (the "OA Impact Advantage"). I will describe the new OA metrics, the OA Advantage, how OA metrics can be tested and validated for use in research assessment. The global relevance of Open Access tag:openaccessweek.ning.com,2010-10-19:5385115:Video:9271 2010-10-19T10:36:17.271Z Marnix van Berchum http://openaccessweek.ning.com/profile/MarnixvanBerchum <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/the-global-relevance-of-open"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974031568?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>Dr. Appy Sluijs is a researcher at Utrecht University, and member of the Young Academy of the KNAW (Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences). His research focuses on climate and climate change in the geological past.<br></br> <br></br> In this short interview Appy Sluijs explains about Open Access journals that have an open reviewing system. Readers can comment on the first version of a paper… <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/the-global-relevance-of-open"><br /> <img src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974031568?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />Dr. Appy Sluijs is a researcher at Utrecht University, and member of the Young Academy of the KNAW (Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences). His research focuses on climate and climate change in the geological past.<br /> <br /> In this short interview Appy Sluijs explains about Open Access journals that have an open reviewing system. Readers can comment on the first version of a paper and with this, the authors can improve the paper for final publication.<br /> <br /> Appy Sluijs is member of the European Geosciences Union, of which all journals are published Open Access. He talks about the grant he received from the European Research Council, and his obligation to publish Open Access and deposit his data.<br /> <br /> In his view Open Access is very important, since his publications have very often local relevance. 'I think Open Access is a very good thing, because it provides the opportunity for everybody on the entire world to look at scientific publications for free.'<br /> <br /> For a project financed by the European Research Council Appy Sluijs also has to publish his data online. He believes that this is the only way to transparency and reuse of science. It's something that researchers should want themselves instead of having to be forced to do this by the ERC. Open Access publiceren met prof. André Aleman tag:openaccessweek.ning.com,2010-10-13:5385115:Video:8030 2010-10-13T09:53:04.030Z Annemiek van der Kuil http://openaccessweek.ning.com/profile/AnnemiekvanderKuil <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/open-access-publiceren-met"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974028415?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>Prof. André Aleman (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands) talks about the articles he has published in an Open Access journal (PLoS ONE). He can check online to see how often his articles have been consulted, downloaded, and cited. That lets him keep track of whether researchers are interested in the topic. Dutch… <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/open-access-publiceren-met"><br /> <img src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974028415?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />Prof. André Aleman (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands) talks about the articles he has published in an Open Access journal (PLoS ONE). He can check online to see how often his articles have been consulted, downloaded, and cited. That lets him keep track of whether researchers are interested in the topic. Dutch spoken There is no reason not to publish Open Access tag:openaccessweek.ning.com,2010-10-13:5385115:Video:8018 2010-10-13T09:39:11.018Z Annemiek van der Kuil http://openaccessweek.ning.com/profile/AnnemiekvanderKuil <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/there-is-no-reason-not-to"><br /> <img alt="Thumbnail" height="180" src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974027571?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240"></img><br /> </a> <br></br>dr. C. (Christoph) Bartneck, assistant professor department Industrial Design of Eindhoven University of Technology (in the Netherlands), explains why he publishes Open Access. "First of all there is no reason not to [publish open access]."<br></br> <br></br> Christoph Bartneck explains that publishing Open Access is quite easy. You can either use the golden road or the green road. He… <a href="http://openaccessweek.ning.com/video/there-is-no-reason-not-to"><br /> <img src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/2974027571?profile=original&amp;width=240&amp;height=180" width="240" height="180" alt="Thumbnail" /><br /> </a><br />dr. C. (Christoph) Bartneck, assistant professor department Industrial Design of Eindhoven University of Technology (in the Netherlands), explains why he publishes Open Access. "First of all there is no reason not to [publish open access]."<br /> <br /> Christoph Bartneck explains that publishing Open Access is quite easy. You can either use the golden road or the green road. He elaborates on the way that publishing is changing dramatically. Through internet the two value creations that publishers had to offer, have gone. And the researchers, being both producers and consumers hold an powerful position in the changing scene.<br /> <br /> Bartneck underestimated the conservatism of some academics. A lot of senior researchers misunderstand Open Access with no peer review and that should not be mixed up.